Monday, November 28, 2016

DOE WITH ANTLERS

Wayne Douville was hunting near Abrams in northeastern Wisconsin on Monday when he shot and killed a 222-pound deer that had eight points on its antlers. Upon closer inspection, the 68-year-old Douville and his aptly-named friend, Mel Buckmaster, discovered the deer had female genitalia.
Jeff Pritzl, district wildlife supervisor for the state Department of Natural Resources, says the doe likely had a higher testosterone level, which might occur in one in 100,000 deer. He says the deer was tagged a buck because the antlers were at least three inches long. Douville says he plans to have the entire deer mounted, though he doubts his wife will let him put it up on the living room wall.

Sunday, October 23, 2016






TWO PIEBOLD DEER (BUCK AND DOE) ON THE SAME DAY

MIKEY JONES - DEER HUNTER



Early this past spring I got a call from Dave Vanderzee, owner of the Easton View Outfitters Ranch in Rensselaer County asking if I could help him with a very important hunt. He had received a call from the Jones family in Vermont about fulfilling their son Mikey’s wish to deer hunt with his dad. His mother, Wannetta explained that Mikey had some severe health problems and heard that Easton View and has hosted several Wounded Warrior hunts, one of which I helped with. Easton View is an ideal set up for these type hunts. Obvious these hunts are paid hunts but not this one for Mikey.

I told Dave I would help and as soon as I got off the phone I emailed all the board members of the New York Outdoor Writers Assn. explaining Mikey’s hunting wish and requested a $1,000 donation to offset some of the costs. I also emailed Katie Mitchell, Corporate Public Relations for Bass Pro Shops asking her for hunting gear. Three days later I received a box of Red Head hunting camo that would cover them from head to toe.

At noon on Thursday October 12 Dave and I met the Jones family. Mikey was eager and was ready to go but two things had to be done; one was to put on their Red Head outfits and the other was for them to check the sights on their guns. Dave thought that the best gun for Mikey would be a .243 and he handed it to him at the range and pointed to the target out about 100 yards out. I honestly was surprised when Mikey’s first shot touched the red quarter sized bullseye. “THIS KID CAN SHOOT”

Before leaving Mikey gave Dave a hug and “Thank you” and handed him two gifts that he had wrapped in camo paper. The first one he opened was an engraved plaque thanking him for making this hunt a reality. The smile on this young man’s face turned on the tears for both Dave and I. The second gift was a blanket with painted deer on it.

TIME TO HUNT
The Jones family then got into a four seat KUBOTA RTV and I followed with the other one. For the first hour we rode around the ranch’s perimeter and saw elk, sika, fallow and whitetail deer, Texas Dall and also a glimpse at a rare Piebald deer. We then climbed into an elevated box blind overlooking a large field. That afternoon we saw a lot of animals that included an awesome 21 point whitetail that was not to be shot. But that afternoon there was no shooting.

At dinner that evening Mikey was a bit worried about getting his deer but I told him tomorrow we had all day and I promised him I would get him one; even if we had to stay out all night with a flashlight. He laughed but I personally was worried. I WANTED THIS YOUNG MAN TO GET A DEER.

The next morning started very slowly sitting in the blind with only a few sightings of out of range whitetails. Doug, one of the ranch hands, volunteered to put on a few deer drives and although he did move deer but none came within range. “Are we going to get a deer Ed?” Mickey said with tears in his eyes.  I had to get this great loveable kid a deer!

Time to do some riding and we were back in the Kubota and started again around the perimeter but all we saw were elk and Texas Dalls. We were just about to enter the swamp when I saw movement in the high brush and it was a deer. I got Mikey ready and when it came out it was a big doe. “No horns” Mikey said. But when I saw it was a Piebald I explained to Mikey that this would be quite a trophy. It was a 162 yard shot and it dropped immediately. I think I was crying before Mikey this time – especially when I saw that big smile. And now it was lunch time and I was relieved now that the pressure was off.

After a leisurely lunch we all climbed in the Kubota to see if we could get dad a deer or one of the Texas Dall. We made a trip around the preserve and as we were coming down through a field I notice deer with just their heads sticking out of the heavy brush; and they both had antlers. Sneaking into position dad turned to Mikey and said: “I have shot plenty of deer Mikey; you take him.” His son was reluctant but when I told him it was a special 8 pointer he changed his mind. Another one shot, this time at 170 yards Mikey put him down and we all were excited. What was special about this deer? It was a Piebald buck. I wonder how many hunters have taken both a Piebald doe and a buck   ON THE SAME DAY. Mikey you are now in a very special hunting group.

There were a lot of wet eyes that afternoon and I was ONE VERY HAPPY GUIDE. I would like to thank the Jones family for letting me hunt with them and their VERY SPECIAL SON. THIS WAS MY BEST DEER HUNT EVER- AND I NEVER FIRED A SHOT!


NOTE: Mikey doesn’t know it but I got a call from my good friend Joe Grieco of JOE’S TAXIDERMY in Albany is donating a free mount of Mikey’s Piebald buck. I am sure this will be hung in a very conspicuous place in the Jones’ home. Thanks Joe.  

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

CHAMPLAIN LONGNOSE GAR CATCH

BEN MISEKIS AND CASANDRA TAMEZ CAUGHT THESE GAR USING HOMEMADE ROPE LURES. BEN'S BIGGEST WAS 57 INCHES LONG AND WEIGHED 15 POUNDS













Monday, July 11, 2016


THE SMALLMOUTH WERE BITING 


Last week I took a party who visit Saratoga during the racing season out fishing on the upper Hudson River between Schuylerville and Stillwater; and it was 4 hours of action. It was Tracy Pletcher with her two sons, Kyle, Payton and daughter Hannah; and Michele and her son Shane Blozis. The first half hour was slow and only one largemouth was caught and released. But it wasn’t too long after, that the smallmouth were biting and everybody began catching.

The real fun began when we started drifting and 4 of them hooked up to smallies while drifting a shoreline in about 8 feet of water. That 500 yard drift produced good smallmouth every time we made it that afternoon. At the end of the trip 13 year old Hannah caught the biggest bass of the day and there were doubts about who caught the most. 

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

SALMON FISHING WITH RODBENDER CHARTERS


One of the best kept fishing secrets is probably less than an hour from your doorstep. It is the landlocked Atlantic salmon in Lake George. Each year NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) stocks this fantastic game fish. This year in May DEC released 15,000. According to DEC Biologist Jim Pinheiro, Lake George is one of the few bodies of water that has a large natural producing population.

Now having not ever caught a salmon, when Dan Ladd, Fort Ann called me and asked if I wanted to fish for them it didn’t take long for me to say “yes.”  Joining us on this outing was Gordon Woodworth, News Editor of the Glens Fall Chronicle. Our guide for the trip was Captain JJ Jeffery Johnson of Diamond Point.

Before heading out JJ briefed us on the equipment we would be using. The trolling rods were graphite custom rods made by FISH307 in Lake George and Okuma line counter reels spooled with 6 to 8 pound test ultra-green monofilament, and the lures were a variety of colored small spoons. All I can say about the electronics is “WOW.” I call them depth finders but they are much more than that. He had one on the dash and one on the stern right near the rods. These were definitely the key for finding fish. He also had an electronic remote control for the motor. And last and equally important were the instructions of what he had to do when there was a strike; and exactly how to bring the fish to the net. He also showed us a photo of the 27.5 inch 10.5 pound salmon taken right where we were going.

Shortly after we left the dock and entered the “salmon” area and began trolling at a depth of 117 feet  JJ told us that there was a school of bait about 40 feet down  so be ready. Shortly after  the rod on the port side Gordon  grabbed the rod; but it turned out to be a 20 inch lake trout; however the size limit for lakers in Lake George is 23 inches and over and a daily limit of 2. Salmon must be 18 inches and also have a daily limit of 2.

We hadn’t gone too much further when Dan also caught a lake trout that measured 25 inch laker that he released. I was next and anxious and I did not have to wait long before the port rod sprung up and before I even touched the rod I saw the salmon jump. And for the next 10 minutes or so I learned how much a salmon can fight. When I got a quick glimpse of the fish I knew I had to get him into the net; and with JJ’s verbal instructions I did. It measured 24 inches and tipped the scales at 5.5 pounds and went into the box, after the photos. Shortly thereafter Dan hooked up with and boated a big bellied salmon that measured 23.5 inches and weighed in at 6 pounds. This too went into the box.

There were several other salmon and lake trout caught and released before we headed back. It was truly a very enjoyable 4 hours of fishing. At the dock Dan asked JJ how many salmon and lake trout he had caught so far this season. His answer was awesome: “About 400 lake trout and 100 salmon.” Very impressive; and so were those salmon filets we took home. THANK YOU JJ!

 If you have never hooked up with a salmon, and or a laker contact JJ at www.CAPTJJ.com or call 668-5657.  

CLICK ON THE PHOTOS